WWW Wednesday | November 20, 2019

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and the purpose is to share what I’ve been reading most recently.
The three W’s are:
What did you recently finish reading?
What are you currently reading?
What are you going to read next?


Recently read

The Dark Prophecy (The Trials of Apollo #2) – Rick Riordan (Re-Read) (🌟🌟🌟🌟)

Go west. Capture Apollo before he can find the next oracle.
If you cannot bring him to me alive, kill him. 

Those were the orders my old enemy Nero had given to Meg McCaffrey. But why would an ancient Roman emperor zero in on Indianapolis? And now that I have made it here (still in the embarrassing form of Lester Papadopoulos), where is Meg?

Meg, my demigod master, is a cantankerous street urchin. She betrayed me to Nero back at Camp Half-Blood. And while I’m mortal, she can order me to do anything . . . even kill myself. Despite all this, if I have a chance of prying her away from her villainous stepfather, I have to try.

But I’m new at this heroic-quest business, and my father, Zeus, stripped me of all my godly powers. Oh, the indignities and pain I have already suffered! Untold humiliation, impossible time limits, life-threatening danger . . . Shouldn’t there be a reward at the end of each completed task? Not just more deadly quests?

I vow that if I ever regain my godhood, I will never again send a poor mortal on a quest. Unless it is really important. And unless I am sure the mortal can handle it. And unless I am pressed for time . . . or I really just don’t feel like doing it myself. I will be much kinder and more generous than everyone is being to me—especially that sorceress Calypso. What does Leo see in her, anyway?

Full review coming soon!


Currently reading

An Ember in the Ashes (An Ember in the Ashes #1) – Sabaa Tahir (Re-Read) 

Laia is a slave.
Elias is a soldier.
Neither is free.

Under the Martial Empire, defiance is met with death. Those who do not vow their blood and bodies to the Emperor risk the execution of their loved ones and the destruction of all they hold dear.

It is in this brutal world, inspired by ancient Rome, that Laia lives with her grandparents and older brother. The family ekes out an existence in the Empire’s impoverished backstreets. They do not challenge the Empire. They’ve seen what happens to those who do.

But when Laia’s brother is arrested for treason, Laia is forced to make a decision. In exchange for help from rebels who promise to rescue her brother, she will risk her life to spy for them from within the Empire’s greatest military academy.

There, Laia meets Elias, the school’s finest soldier—and secretly, its most unwilling. Elias wants only to be free of the tyranny he’s being trained to enforce. He and Laia will soon realize that their destinies are intertwined—and that their choices will change the fate of the Empire itself.

Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen (Re-Read)

Since its immediate success in 1813, Pride and Prejudice has remained one of the most popular novels in the English language. Jane Austen called this brilliant work “her own darling child” and its vivacious heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, “as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.” The romantic clash between the opinionated Elizabeth and her proud beau, Mr. Darcy, is a splendid performance of civilized sparring. And Jane Austen’s radiant wit sparkles as her characters dance a delicate quadrille of flirtation and intrigue, making this book the most superb comedy of manners of Regency England.


Up next

The Guinevere Deception (Camelot Rising #1) – Kiersten White

Princess Guinevere has come to Camelot to wed a stranger: the charismatic King Arthur. With magic clawing at the kingdom’s borders, the great wizard Merlin conjured a solution — send in Guinevere to be Arthur’s wife… and his protector from those who want to see the young king’s idyllic city fail. The catch? Guinevere’s real name — and her true identity — is a secret. She is a changeling, a girl who has given up everything to protect Camelot. 

To keep Arthur safe, Guinevere must navigate a court in which the old — including Arthur’s own family — demand things continue as they have been, and the new — those drawn by the dream of Camelot — fight for a better way to live. And always, in the green hearts of forests and the black depths of lakes, magic lies in wait to reclaim the land. Arthur’s knights believe they are strong enough to face any threat, but Guinevere knows it will take more than swords to keep Camelot free.

Deadly jousts, duplicitous knights, and forbidden romances are nothing compared to the greatest threat of all: the girl with the long black hair, riding on horseback through the dark woods toward Arthur. Because when your whole existence is a lie, how can you trust even yourself?


What are you reading this week? Let me know in the comments below!


6 thoughts on “WWW Wednesday | November 20, 2019

  1. Kitty Marie's Book Reviews Blog November 20, 2019 / 7:00 am

    An Ember In The Ashes looks good! Hearing Pride and Prejudice reminds me that it’s a pretty short read right? Sounds like a good option for December maybe. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • journeyintofantasy November 20, 2019 / 11:39 pm

      It’s a great series! Yes, Pride and Prejudice is a pretty short book and great for a quick read. Hope you enjoy it!

      Like

  2. Mayah November 20, 2019 / 3:02 pm

    I recently finished The Tyants Tomb too!! It was so awesome

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Alynn98 November 20, 2019 / 11:00 pm

    Ooo! I really need to start The Guinevere Deception! And I just received the new book in the Trials of Apollo series, so I hope you’re enjoying them!

    Liked by 1 person

    • journeyintofantasy November 20, 2019 / 11:44 pm

      I just picked up The Guinevere Deception from my library and it looks amazing. I can hardly wait to get started! The Tyrant’s Tomb was a fantastic read, hope you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s